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DIET II (DETAILS)

© Copyright 2011 Ty Parr, Ph.D.(All Rights Reserved)  Updated  30Apr2011     

INDEX
     Carbohydrates ( & Glycemic Index
  )
     Fruits
     Fats & Oils (Seeds & Nuts)
     Pre- & Probiotics
     Proteins

CARBOHYDRATES
Since the agricultural revolution, carbohydrates from a limited number of sources have been the principal energy fuel for humans. The predominance of wheat, oats, rice, and some other grains (Sorghum, etc.) constitute the majority of human energy sources. After the conquest of the new world, Europe gained the benefits of potatoes and corn as a carbohydrate source. Our modern high levels of human populations are totally dependent on a grain supported food chain.

Since about 1800's, most developed world nations have increased their intake of simple sugars (mono and disaccharides) relative to complex carbohydrates that are more typical of a nutritionally smarter diet. This is just a part of the increased processing of our foods that has led to a more rapid delivery of final digestion products. By so doing increased the burden on our insulin producing pancreas. As covered in the How & Why Section, this rapid delivery of nutrients rather than a slow delivery is accelerating our inflammation and our premature death from age-associated diseases.

In the case of simple sugars, this is now widely understood by very well supported scientific papers.

Animals fed varying amounts of sucrose in diet suffer same insulin resistance and obesity with higher sucrose. < increased fraction of calories from simple sugar sucrose in an iso-caloric diet (total carbohydrate calories fixed = sucrose + complex carbohydrates) leads to higher levels of obesity and insulin resistance (diminished effect of insulin, requiring more insulin for same effect) > A carbohydrate diet rich in sucrose increased insulin and WAT in macronutrient self-selecting rats. Wetzler S, Jean C, Tomé D, Larue-Achagiotis C. .Physiol Behav. 2003 Sep;79(4-5):695-700.< current authors clarification>

This simple sugar degradation of insulin sensitivity contrasts with increased insulin sensitivity when consuming whole grains.

Higher intakes of whole grains were associated with increases in insulin sensitivity.   Whole-grain intake and insulin sensitivity: the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study.  Liese AD, Roach AK, Sparks KC, Marquart L, D'Agostino RB Jr, Mayer-Davis EJ.   Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Nov;78(5):965-71     < current authors emphasis >

These last two comments encapsulate our problem and offer us a solution. Simple sugar consumption degrades our insulin sensitivity and requires higher levels of daily exposure to insulin to keep our blood sugar at moderate levels. Our bodies are adapted to complex carbohydrates that can slowly be broken down into readily available simple sugars, but we suffer metabolic, hormonal, and overall health problems when we take in large amounts of simple sugars. We are still exposed to simple sugars (principally glucose and fructose) in both cases, however the consequences of rapid load in to the blood of transient high levels are many times more injurious to our overall insulin sensitivity than slower much more gradual process. Our job is to find ways to keep a lower the burden of simple sugar exposure over a longer period (high energy and high satisfaction) without over eating.

We can accomplish this by eating slow to digest complex carbohydrates with a good balance to our actual energy needs. Moreover, we can alter the speed of glucose uptake by our cooking and food preparation methods.

REMEMBER: we are doing this because elevated insulin levels are tightly coupled with elevated TOR gene activation and thus drive our intrinsic rate of aging. Lowering insulin exposure will lower TOR activation and slow our intrinsic rate of aging.

One of the most important tools for determining how fast a particular food will deliver its simple sugars to our blood stream is indicated by the Glycemic Index (GI). This Glycemic Index (GI) is a measure of how rapidly a given food is converted to absorbed blood sugar elevation. Since blood sugar elevation causes insulin
production and release, very high levels of rapid glucose elevation lead to huge demands on our pancreas. Too many years of such sudden huge burst requirements can diminish the ability of our pancreas to respond as needed. Thus we at later ages may not be able to produce and release as much insulin. If our blood glucose rise is too high, this leaves us for a longer period at elevated (inflammation causing) blood sugar that also deranges organ function of eyes, brain, liver, pancrease, kidney, muscles, etc..

This rapid (high GI) versus slower (low GI) delivery of glucose is shown in the below graphic. for HIGH and LOW Gl Foods. The rapid (high GI) versus slower (low GI) delivery of glucose is high GI rapid delivery of a large amount of glucose into the blood requires a corresponding rapid production of insulin. The reverse is true for the low GI delivery to blood.

  

Shown in the first left graph below is the typical daily intake of very available processed foods that rapidly spike blood glucose after each of three meals with the similar need for a spiked level of insulin to clear out the high blood sugar. This places great demands on our pancreatic insulin output that will exhaust the pancreas before our life span is over. Instead of this extreme spiked delivery of glucose to our system, the second lower graph demonstrates an ideal very slow delivery of glucose over a 8-12 hour period. The recipe for this slow delivery of glucose from whole grains can be found under Ty's ALL DAY ENERGY. At no time during this slow delivery does the glucose-insulin graph spike. It is a slow continuous lower elevation of both that minimizes the burden on our pancreas. This has consequences over the life time shown in the two right graphs showing how a lower insulin exposure leads to a longer life span (literally a Longer Healthy Life).

The Glycemic Index ( GI ) of a food is based on a scale of 'how rapidly a specified amount of a food' (grams or ounces) will raise blood glucose levels. Glucose is the standard for this scale, glucose =100 units (arbitrary). Blood glucose is monitored for 2-3 hours until the elevated glucose level returns to the Maintained base line Blood Glucose level. The area under the curve- that is the glucose elevation time course until it touches the Maintained Blood Sugar level again is assigned a value of 100 (for glucose standard). Where there is no effect of a food on blood glucose, the value would be = 0 as there is no elevation of blood glucose to get an area from. The same test is performed on the same amount of any given food stuff to determine the food's GI. Notice how the blood plasma glucose elevation (blood clear fluid with cells centrifuged out)  is very much greater in the case of eating HIGH Glycemic Index  ( GI ) foods. Correspondingly, LOW GI foods have much smaller areas under the curve before returning to baseline. Note also in the case of HIGH Glycemic Index case, there is a tendency to oscillate from far above and then below the normally maintained blood glucose level. These needless oscillations cause the "sugar highs" and then ensuing "sugar cravings" that derail healthy management of food intake. Since elevations in blood glucose levels are responded to by elevations in blood insulin levels this is a good indication of how how rapidly and how high insulin levels will be driven by a particular food. In the case of the LOW Glycemic Index food  ( GI ) foods, much lower glucose and  much  lower insulin levels are experienced. People with disturbed insulin handling of glucose (metabolic syndrome (insulin resistance) all the way up to nearing type 2 Diabetes) have much longer periods of high glucose levels above the baseline, which is why it is so important for them to eat LOW GI foods. Not only is it wise for "border line diabetics" to eat LOW GI foods, it is also profoundly wise for ordinary healthy people to lower their exposure to elevated insulin levels.Each food can be placed in High (100-70), Mid (56-69), or Low (55 or less) GI levels. All humans are wise to avoid the High (70-100) GI foods as they place a great strain on your pancreatic insulin out put. Only people who do not have type-2-Diabetes should eat from the Mid range (56-69) because this too places strain on your pancreas to output insulin. Type-2-Diabetics should eat primarily from the low group, with only occasional Mid groups foods. We are in this for the long haul of our entire life. The object is to have very slow delivery of nutrients from our foods. This is largely the exact opposite of most processed prepared food that tries to give you a happy rush of fast absorbed nutrients to increase sales. The bigest offender here is carbohydrate, but the same applies to protein because of mTOR monitoring of amino acids. Rapid elevations of either glucose or amino acids have negative effects on our Insulin/IGF-1 hormonal axis and on the mTOR cellular integrator of actual nutritional status. When your food produces a rapid high level of blood sugar and amino acids, you are needlessly 'REVING' these two controller systems. You are setting up a misdirected over re-action ofhigh nutrient availability triggers a hypertrophy of some protein synthesis that is not only unneeded but injures the best function of cells. This was described by the Bagoskny quote in the How & Why Section. We know that the elevation of mTOR reduces life span in lower animals and we know that partially blocking mTOR in older rodents (by use of Rapamycin ) leads to a longer life span.. This also means much lower insulin driven TOR gene activation levels and thus, long term a slower rate of aging with a Longer Healthy Life.

What are the Benefits of the international Glycemic Index?
Eating a lot of high GI foods can be detrimental to your health because it pushes your body to extremes. This is especially true if you are overweight and sedentary. Switching to eating mainly low GI carbohydrates that slowly trickle glucose into your blood stream keeps your energy levels balanced and means you will feel fuller for longer between meals.
    •    Low GI diets help people lose and manage weight
    •    Low GI diets increase the body's sensitivity to insulin
    •    Low GI carbs improve diabetes management
    *    Low GI carbs reduce the risk of heart disease
    *    Low GI carbs improve blood cholesterol levels
    *    Low GI carbs reduce hunger and keep you fuller for longer
    *    Low GI carbs prolong physical endurance
    *    High GI carbs help re-fuel carbohydrate stores after exercise



An abbreviated Glycemic Index (GI) is shown below.
( scale based on speed of glucose absorption with glucose =100,  and absence of effect on from blood sugar set = 0 )
HIGH GI FOODS        (>70                      LOW GI FOODS  (<55)
Glucose 100
Baguette                          95                        Special K                               54
Rice, Instant                    91                        Whole wheat breads & rolls    54
Puffed wheat                   89                         Whole grain bread                 53
Corn-flakes                      84                         Sourdough bread                  52
Rice cakes                       82                         Kiwi fruit                                 52
Rice krispies                    82                         Carrots,boiled                        49
Jelly Beans                      80                         Milk chocolate                        49
French Fries                    75                         Peas                                      48
Bran flakes                      74                        Baked beans only                    48
Cheerios                          74                         Green Grapes                        46
Bagel                               72                         Macaroni                                 45
White bread                     70                        Lentil soup                               44
                                                                    Oranges                                   44
MEDIUM GI FOODS  (56-69)                      All Bran                                   42
Cantaloupe                          67                    Chick peas                               42
Croissant                             67                    Peaches                                   42
Shredded wheat                   67                    Enriched white flour spaghetti 41
Pineapple,fresh                    66                     Apple juice, unsweetened       40
Couscous                            65                    Noodles                                    40
Rye bread                            65                    Prunes                                     40
Apricots, canned in syrup   64                    Whole grain spaghetti               37
Raisins                                 64                     Apples                                     38
Ice cream                             61                     Pears                                       38
Cheese & tomato pizza        60                     Tomato soup, canned             38
Basmati rice                         58                     Fettucini pasta                         32
Pita bread                             57                    Skim milk                                  32
Meusli, non-toasted             56                     Dried apricots                           31
Brown rice                           55                    Butter beans                              31
Banana                                 55                    Wheat Berries, hard red winter30
Strawberries                         56                   Oat groat (whole grain)             30
Sweet corn                            55                    Whole milk                               27
Brown rice                            55                    Pearl barley                              25
HONEY   .                            62-80                Red lentils                                 26 
                                                                     Cherries                                   22
                                                                     Fructose                                   15
                                                                     Roasted,salted peanuts           14
                                                                     Low-fat yogurt (no fruit/sugars)14

PLEASE NOTE HOW WHOLE GRAINS (COOKED NORMALLY) ARE IN GLYCEMIC INDEX (35-25)
After you use a simpler and faster minimal cooking, these will drop to much lower levels !
FOR A MUCH LARGER TABLE OF GLYCEMIC INDEX CLICK HERE

HIGH Glycemic Index  - ( >70 )  (Glucose = 100)
The general rules are that all processed grains , most candies, and most white bread and many other breads (Glycemic Index DISASTERS)
MID Glycemic Index - (56-69)
Many sweet fruits, some grains like corn and rice, rye bread and shredded wheat, pita bread, 
LOW Glycemic Index ( < 55 )
whole grains, beans(including peanuts), sourdough bread, many fruits, most non-starchy vegetables


If you don't now have a healthy adult glycemic response, the glucose and insulin levels reached will be much higher than indicated by the GI classification scheme - with more severe effects on activation of the TOR gene and subsequent increases in the intrinsic rate of aging. It will also place an ever greater burden on your pancreas to put out continually higher level of insulin as your tissue insulin resistance of muscle, liver and fat cells increases. This way leads to Type 2 diabetes and its very unpleasant effects on eyes (impaired vision to blindness), heart disease and limb amputation due to poor blood flow that permits bacterial invasions. We all  wish to avoid this. If one has traveled this road a ways, one can still regain basic health by massively lowering the rate of glucose delivery to our blood stream  that will place much less burden on our pancreas (produces insulin). For Type 2 diabetics, a careful following to the rules of low  Glycemic Index  (GI) foods is an absolute necessity to avoid further complications and further worsening of this profoundly unnecessary disease. With the exception of some very unfortunate genetic examples, Type 2 diabetes is world wide largely and optional disease that relates to excessive obesity and excessive sugar and high glycemic index food choices. You profoundly don't need this, leave it !

"Dietary glycemic index < (GI) > is positively associated with HOMA-IR < Insulin-Resistance correlates with high Glycemic index (more readily available simple sugar foods) dietary choice > and prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. Given that both a high cereal fiber content and lower glycemic index are attributes of whole-grain foods, recommendation to increase whole-grain intake may reduce the risk of developing the metabolic syndrome.    "Carbohydrate Nutrition, Insulin Resistance, and the Prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome in the Framingham Offspring Cohort"  McKeown NM, Meigs JB, Liu S, Saltzman E, Wilson PW, Jacques PF Diabetes Care. 2004 Feb;27(2):613-4.    < current  author clarification,  metabolic syndrome is a gradual loss of insulin sensitivity with a rise in glucose levels and often hypertension .  This is the common precursor to Type 2 Diabetes>


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PDF on
Syndrome X (Metabolic Syndrome) - gradual development of insulin resistance, pot belly, hypertension, and often to type2 Diabetes.        

Click here on this SUBSCRIBE button or the SUBSCRIBE  button in MENU section.  ($30/year, all current PDF's and all future ones for a 1 year period will be emailed to your mailbox).
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Returning to our central theme of lowering the magnitude of total insulin exposure, there are two further factors that influence this keeping of lower insulin exposure:

1. how well we have preserved our bodies ability to be sensitive to insulin effects (insulin sensitivity) in removing glucose from the blood and

2. how we cook our food that can raise or lower the Glycemic Index of that food.

1. There is a gradual decline in insulin sensitivity shown in the  contrast between a healthy older versus a healthy young person handling of any given incoming blood sugar. (how rapidly the person lowers glucose to proper blood sugar levels and thus how much cumulative exposure to higher insulin levels). Younger individuals rarely have degraded their insulin sensitivity (unless they regularly drink  high fructose corn syrup containing sodas or are simple sugar addicts). The older one gets, the greater the decline in insulin sensitivity of our tissues  (principally muscles, liver, and fat cells), forcing the body to accommodate by elevating insulin output. This is primarily associated with increased body mass (developing obesity) which also goes up with age in most individuals world wide (exceptions are people like the Thai's and a few other cultures as well as some individuals in all societies). Of course, this elevated insulin also drives up the TOR gene activity
that helps to generate the inflammation that accelerates the intrinsic rate of aging. This acceleration of the rate of mortality with age is a hallmark of all mammalian species and may be the non-linear effect of elevated insulin driven TOR gene activation and the ensuing inflammatory acceleration. This acceleration of the rate of deaths per population corresponds in humans to about a doubling of the death rate every 8 years of further human life from emid adult hood forward.

2.  How much we cook foods greatly can alter the real versus the reported Glycemic Index ( GI ) of a food.  If whole grain-carbohydrates are cooked to mush, they are very rapidly enter the blood stream to elevate blood glucose. This would also lead to an extremely  rapid increase in blood sugar then insulin, with the ensuing  elevated TOR activity levels. Keep this up for years and you will have much faster aging and a shorter life with more rapid onset of age associated diseases. Imagine the opposite(diagramed below): you just barely cook
or just soak the grains for 6-8 hrs in room temp. whole grains (anything form red hard winter wheat , oat groats, barley, short grain brown rice, etc. or a mix together). These grains are chewy with a pleasing resistance to bite (chewy but not crunchy).  When you bite them , they are broken up into good size chunks that you then swallow without trying to reduce them to a smooth paste. These larger structure are minimally hydrated and very slow to become available - so slow that you are satisfied for 7-12 hours after eating! Look back again at our three meals a day with super high glucose then insulin spikes and then crashing falls. The difference with the VERY LOW Glycemic index is a very gradual release of glucose into your blood stream over a much longer time - needing much lower levels of insulin. This can be seen in the graphic below. The process does not have a super rise then crash phase. You are using most of your small intestine to absorb this slowly delivered glucose (we will return to this later on). Hours of steady stable energy supplies that leave you with energy for those 7-12 hours - not the massive rise and then rapid crash in blood sugar due to huge insulin spurts. These hard to digest chunks also travel further through the small intestine before being exhausted of their glucose. In addition to the long period of nutritional and energy satiety and satisfaction from such a meal, one has very slight demands placed on the pancreas and no oscillations  between high and too low levels of blood sugar seen above in the above graph of the Glycemic Response of Healthy adults to HIGH Glycemic Index foods.. This oscillation around stable blood sugar levels is not a well liked event as it causes super sugar highs that alternate with sugar cravings. This is not in the interest of your overall health or good food intake control as you will alternate sugar highs with sugar cravings.
A better understanding of the consequences of only partially cooking our grains: see
Ty's ALL DAY ENERGY

BENEFITS OF Ty's ALL DAY ENERGY

What are the long range hormonal, energy balance, and longevity benefits of this VERY LOW GI sustained delivery?
Our normal meals have huge rises in blood glucose, followed by spiking then collapsing insulin levels with the need to convert some of the glucose surge to fat creation. This huge need to clear the blood of high levels of glucose causes major stress on the pancreas with spiking insulin also elevating TOR gene activity. Remember that elevation of TOR activity misdirects cells incapable of cell division (most of our cells) toward protein synthesis activity directed toward cell division. Since this is impossible for most of our cells, it detracts from the on going need for tissue specific function ( for example liver or muscle cells doing what is required for that tissue). This high insulin spike also predisposes cells in the body to turn down insulin receptors (especially in muscle, liver, and fat cells) which increases insulin resistance and the ensuing problems leading to dysfunctional insulin action.  This creation of fat from glucose is a natural response to massive temporary glucose over abundance, however, when we return to modest hunger, initiating fat mobilization is rarely a smooth transition. The natural difficulty of easily taping fat reserves when we become modestly hungry after the normal typical blood glucose oscillations leads us to want to consume food again resulting in the typical climb in body weight with age. Gradually developing obesity also leads to a huge variety of inflammatory and dysfunctional metabolic consequences, many that are now acknowledged to be instrumental in promoting the needlessly premature diseases of age.

A VERY LOW Glycemic Index partly cooked
or just soaked grain (only just chewy, but not crunchy grains) that is not chewed to paste, but swallowed as various sizes chunks leads to a very slow liberation of glucose from this mixture over a prolonged period and over a much large region of the small intestine. This delivery to a larger part of the small intestine has profound health consequences that are explained and developed in the Subscriber only PDF on Auto-immunity. This slow delivery of glucose places minimal demands on the pancreas. The pancreas normally puts out some 50% of total daily insulin during basal or stable blood glucose maintained levels in a healthy individual. This slow delivery can be mostly used by body cells to maintain normal metabolism, lowering the need to use fat and potentially lowering the level of triglyceride circulating in the blood (largely why insulin levels and insulin resistance elevations of insulin levels are well correlated with elevated triglycerides and free fatty acid levels). Thus, there is less tendency to store this glucose as fat, instead it is mostly used to power ongoing metabolic activities. Since one has a long period of nutritional satisfaction (at least 7-12 hours), there is little tendency for physiologic prompting to consume food for a prolonged time. This lessens the tendency to over consume food and the gradual consequent obesity that ensues. This will not overcome the psychological needs for food (often "comfort foods" high in sat and sugar) . The steady long period of sufficient delivery of glucose energy at low excess will lower daily total insulin exposure, lower the excess insulin compensation lowering of  insulin receptor levels (hence lower insulin resistance) and keep the level of TOR gene activity low. Ty's ALL DAY ENERGY.

Why Whole Grains?

Whole-grain intake was inversely associated with homocysteine and markers of glycemic control... The results suggest a lower risk of diabetes and heart disease in persons who consume diets high in whole grains. Whole Grains, bran, and germ in relation to homocysteine and markers of glycemic control, lipids, and inflammation 1 Jensen MK, Koh-Banerjee P, Franz M, Sampson L, Grønbaek M, Rimm EB .Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jun;83(6):1443

Note that only to a lesser degree does ground up (processed) whole grains have as much benefit as intact whole grains. Whole grain breads are more rapidly available with a higher GI. Whole wheat berries (cooked normally, not the "only" till chewy whole grain VERY LOW GI technique" !) have a GI = 30, while Whole Wheat Bread has a GI= 52. which also means higher GI and insulin release and the consequent higher insulin driven TOR activity elevation.

Thus, even when within the LOW Glycemic Index category, going even lower in GI brings ADDED PROTECTION for a Longer Healthy Life.

SUGARS YOU SHOULD NOT EAT OR EAT SPARINGLY

FRUCTOSE - Fruits contain SUCROSE = fruit sugar = Fructose + Glucose disaccharide- not a reducing sugar disaccharide. Fructose has a major disadvantage. It forms fat to a much higher level than glucose. While furctose has a much lower Glycemic Index (GI) (15 for fructose) than glucose (100), it is still a problem. Thus we will selectively eat whole fruits, not fruit juices that supply large amounts of fructose.  Fruit juices can be enjoyed as small amounts of flavor, never a huge drink. Large amounts of fruit juice just feeds your simple sugar addiction - that pushes you toward obesity and type-2-dibetes.

GALACTOSE - Diabetics & people with cataracts should not eat galactose (milk in particular) or sorbital containing foods as these tend to promote cataracts (diabetic retinopathology is Glucose, sorbital and glactose driven)

Chronic systemic exposure of D-galactose to mice, rats, and Drosophila causes the acceleration of senescence and has been used as an pro-aging model.


Chronic systemic exposure of mice, rats, and Drosophila to D-galactose causes the acceleration of senescence and has been used as an aging model.[3]...  If a galactose-free diet is administered, cataracts and acute symptoms such as kidney and liver failure respond immediately.   Galactose  Wikipedia

Cataracts - Over 1 million cataract operations paid by medicare/year with some 12% of medicare budget (1990) Cataract PPOs Allan D. Jensen, MD Arch Ophthalmol. 1990;108(4):501-502.

Some 20 million Americans over 40 have cataracts. What is cost to tax payers? It is estimated to cost the federal government $3.4 billion per year in the U.S. and is the most commonly   performed ophthalmic procedure. [Source: Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, July 2001, Vol. 42, No. 8, page 1677]
http://www.aao.org/newsroom/press_kit/upload/Eye_Stats_3-5-07.pdf)

LACTOSE, A Reducing sugar (forms AGE's with protein or lipids, LACTOSE = milk sugar = Galactose + Glucose) . - used at 50 -100mg/kg 1/10,000 to 1/20,000 of animal weight 6 oz yogurt (170 g)has % lactose/2 for galactose

145 lb Hu 65 kg/20000 = 3.25 grams (6.5 g if 1/10000 of weight)


http://www.aao.org/newsroom/press_kit/upload/Eye_Stats_3-5-07.pdf)

AMD Q: How many people in the U.S. have age-related macular degeneration (AMD)?
A: More than 1.6 million Americans age 50 and older have late AMD. [Source: Vision Problems in the U.S. report,
developed by the National Eye Institute and Prevent Blindness America, 2002]

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Not yet posted VEGETABLES, FRUITS, LIPIDS, SEEDS & NUTS, PROTEIN

LIPIDS

Summarize Critical 2007 experiment with yeasts - substituting non-fermentable nutrients (read fats) that are life extending without having to starve. This means that most of the benefits of caloric restriction that appears to be beneficial to every phyla of animals arise from lowering the levels of exposure to dietary sugars (carbohydrates) that lowers insulin which in tern lowers insulin driven TOR activation. Thus aerobic respiration of non-sugar nutrients FATS) is not nearly as harmful to longevity as sugar driven insulin elevation with consequent insulin driven TOR elevation. We cannot forgo making a basal level of glucose for our brain, but that will be handled by our bodies at the bodies set level of glucose maintenance. We are eating our 20% of total calories by the very slow delivery (Ty's ALL DAY ENERGYTM) carbohydrates to keep the bacterial endosymboints in our gut happy so that they balance our immune system. An additional benefit that "can" be gained by keeping these symbiotic gut bacteria happy will be known by SUBSCRIBERS as detailed in the AUTOIMMUNITY PDF.

So high a fat diet as to put on weight has negative effects on certain learning behaviors in rats (such as learned bar pressing operant behavior). Additionally there is some altered cerebral insulin sensitivity loss (like normal obesity in whole body 17081630 , The lesson is eat enough fat (some 60% of calories) to maintain trim weight, don’t over eat.to become overweight . Our purpose her is to gain the potential life span extension benefits of a lower carbohydrate (sugar) driven insulin elevation and t

Polynesian atolls survey for diet of mid range fatty acids (lauric acid) - no heart disease

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Nuts & SEEDS

Observational studies suggest nut consumption is inversely associated with the incidence of cardiovascular disease and cancer. In addition to being rich in several vitamins and minerals, unsaturated fatty acids, and fiber, tree nuts and peanuts contain numerous phytochemicals that may contribute to promoting health and reducing the risk of chronic disease. While many of these bioactive constituents remain to be fully identified and characterized, broad classes include carotenoids, phenols, and phytosterols Phytochemical composition of nuts. Chen CY, Blumberg JB. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008;17 Suppl 1:329-32. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18296370

 

 

 

Nuts & SEEDS

Observational studies suggest nut consumption is inversely associated with the incidence of cardiovascular disease and cancer. In addition to being rich in several vitamins and minerals, unsaturated fatty acids, and fiber, tree nuts and peanuts contain numerous phytochemicals that may contribute to promoting health and reducing the risk of chronic disease. While many of these bioactive constituents remain to be fully identified and characterized, broad classes include carotenoids, phenols, and phytosterols Phytochemical composition of nuts. Chen CY, Blumberg JB. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008;17 Suppl 1:329-32. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18296370

 

 

 

Not yet posted VEGETABLES, FRUITS, LIPIDS, SEEDS & NUTS, PROTEIN

LIPIDS

SummarizeCritical 2007 experiment with yeasts - substituting non-fermentable nutrients (read fats) that are life extending without having to starve. This means that most of the benefits of caloric restriction that appears to be beneficial to every phyla of animals arise from lowering the levels of exposure to dietary sugars (carbohydrates) that lowers insulin which in tern loweres insulin driven TOR activation. Thus aerobic respiration of non-sugar nutrients FATS) is not nearly as harmful to longevity as sugar driven insulin elevation with consequent insulin driven TOR elvation. We cannot forgo making a basal level of glucose for our brain, but that will be handled by our bodies at the bodies set level of glucose maintenance. We are eating our 20% of total calories by the very slow delivery (Ty's ALL DAY ENERGYTM) carbohydrates to keep the bacterial endosymboints in our gut happy so that they balance our immune system. An additional benefit that "can" be gained by keeping these symbiotic gut bacteria happy will be known by SUBSCRIBERS as detailed in the AUTOIMMUNITY PDF.

So high a fat diet as to put on weight has negative effects on cetrain learning behaviours in rats (such as learned bar pressing operant behavior). Additionally there is some altered cerebral insulin sensitivity loss (like normal obesity in whole body 17081630 , The lesson is eat enough fat (some 60% of calories) to maintain trim weight, don’t over eat.to become overweight . Our purpose her is to gain teh potential life span extension benefits of a lower carbohydrate (sugar) driven insulin elevatioin and t

Polynesian atolls survey fo diet of mid range fatty aciids (lauric acid) - no heart disease

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Nuts & SEEDS

Observational studies suggest nut consumption is inversely associated with the incidence of cardiovascular disease and cancer. In addition to being rich in several vitamins and minerals, unsaturated fatty acids, and fiber, tree nuts and peanuts contain numerous phytochemicals that may contribute to promoting health and reducing the risk of chronic disease. While many of these bioactive constituents remain to be fully identified and characterized, broad classes include carotenoids, phenols, and phytosterols Phytochemical composition of nuts. Chen CY, Blumberg JB. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008;17 Suppl 1:329-32. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18296370

 

 

MUST BUY ORGANIC & virgin(not adulterated):
    Butter(very high pesticides,herbacides etc.unless orgainc & preferably grass fed (best is Butter Oil!)),
    Coconout oil (virgin only),
    Olive Oil (virgin
Fruits & Veges must buy ORGANIC:
    peaches,
    strawberries,
    spinach,
    kale(spinach & kale have high insectisides applied),
Vegetables need not buy organic:
    broccoli,
    onion,
    avocado,
    mango
    asparagus,
    kiwi,
    cabbage,
    papaya (nonGM),
    watermellon, &
    fresh farmers market tomatoes

 

 

 

 




HOW DID WE ARRIVE AT A LESS HEALTHY DIET?        THE QUICK FIX !

Humans are born with a sweet tooth for mothers milk. Our long evolution has experienced many periods of sever hunger that made it wise to eat fat and sugar/carbohydrates whenever we could find it. However, this is not the primary reason. Animals will try to maintain normal weight when sufficient food is present (  Seeley, RJ Schwartz, MW  Neuroendocrine regulation of food intake (1999)Acta Pædiatr Suppl 428, 58-61), even when presented with over fat inducing food - they just won't eat as much. So why do some cultures like the USA  have about 1/3 overweight and another 1/3 clinically obese?

Besides not being educated into the information above, a lot has to do with quick fixes that are largely modeled on the magic pills of medicine. When antibiotics were first introduced in 1932, it was almost unbelievable to see incredibly fast recovery from what were potentially lethal infections. This immediate "drug pill fix" became a cultural expectation, an expectation that allowed us to relax our self control and self care. If we are afflicted with some aliment, go to the doctor and he will dispense a pill to make it all go away. The same logic guides both our pharmaceutical and scientific research today. This belief was further augmented by our electronic age where everything is nearly instantaneous (digital super fast) . There is no pill to make years of unhealthy eating and lack of exercise all go away instantly. This is a gradual process of regaining our health by eating wisely and exercising.

High levels of stress and insecurity is a second reason that applies particularly to the USA. When under stress, we tend to eat fast food, and generally don't maintain good care for our body.

The final reason is the worst of all.
The need to keep the financial wheels of industry and employment spinning around in our unhealthy culture causes both health maintenance & our(drug misdirected) medicine to become an parasitic extractive industry. Sell bogus adulterated but cheap "food" or amazingly stupid solutions that even a little bit of critical evaluation would debunk immediately. For this to work, you only need people uninformed about health in their education and a loss of the long term nutritional cultural knowledge(that was not well articulated because of the complexity of nutrition) that our ancestors gained at such high price. Then we will buy into the "latest and greatest" that has no long term tests of sustainability or long term health (INNOVATIVE IGNORANCE driven by IMMORAL(=stupid) PROFIT MOTIVES ). A GOOD PROFIT MOTIVE would be to supply excellent food and refuse to cheapen it by injuring its NUTRITION for money. We will see this process with much greater clarity in the  DON'Ts section.

Again - Why are we doing this?
The predominant cause of our age related diseases and the intrinsic rate of aging are now recognized to relate to disturbed hormonal and homeostatic control largely due to our blood sugar rises with consequent insulin rises that alter metabolic and hormonal  processes for the worse .
This is primarily about the direct problems with elevated insulin and destabilizing the insulin-growth hormone axis by rapidly available carbohydrate and excessive fat intake. This elevated insulin jacks up the level of cellular TOR Gene activity that misdirects cellular activities away form tissue specific needs to getting ready for a division that will not take place (cannot take place in most adult tissues). This is caused principally by high simple sugar and readily available sugar from rapidly delivered carbohydrates to  blood as glucose (or fructose). We need to recognize this pathological huge intake of simple sugars (and complex carbohydrates that rapidly turn into readily available simple sugars) that then elevates body weight and accelerates our aging. This process is "self feeding" (forgive the pun) to higher levels that reoccur as increasing FUTILE CYCLES. Even the healthiest diet of good foods will still have this ongoing disturbance  of the insulin-GH balance and other hormonal and metabolic balances along with a more gradual increase in insulin and elevated TOR gene activity, but not nearly as much. The choice is yours.

We cannot completely escape this gradual destabilization process - that constitutes most of the normal early adolescent to late midlife aging process. But, we sure can slow it down. Protein, unlike carbohydrates is a necessary intake, but protein in the form of its digest into amino acids also elevates insulin and TOR . Not only does this destabilize our insulin-growth hormone axis over time, but combined with over eating it also generates higher free radical damage that accumulates as increasing percentage of oxidatively damaged proteins.

A young man has perhaps 10% oxidatively damaged  cellular proteins, while a 70 year old man has some 50% of his proteins oxidatively damaged (Protein Modifications with Aging  Levine, RL & Stadtman, ER  IN: Handbook of the Biology of Aging (4th Ed.) 184-197 (1996)).

 Ability of the old to function well and especially to handle unusual stresses is extremely decreased with such a high rate of oxidative damage. This gradual decline in our reserve capacities sets us up for all the later diseases that attend late life.

This seems like a Joseph Heller "Catch 22" situation: to live we must eat, and to eat we seem to be accelerating our aging. The way to minimize this problem is to construct a very different food pyramid that emphasizes whole unprocessed foods that are very slowly digestedrather than extensively processed nutrient depleted "commercial"processed food. This unprocessed food and the slow delivery of nutrients for a prolonged satiety period along with appropriate exercise takes into account the modern understanding that most of our needlessly "too soon" age related diseases are due to failing these conditions. What we need is much slower delivery of carbohydrate derived glucose, a similar slow release of proteins, and a much higher protective plant food intake. All this in a diet that provides our needs without promoting obesity. Obesity triggers yet even more insulin exposure and leads to further destabilization of our hormonal balances. This diet will not massively extend our lives, but it will greatly extend our healthy life period. We can work on the massive life extension later in this site in the LONGEVITY section.

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